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Photographer, Sculptor Allia Georges blurs the lines between the two art forms

And we are all in for the breathtaking, contemporary visuals.

TEXT Suhani Lotlikar 









“It seems three dimensional works are usually the less preferred art-form in comparison with other mediums such as painting and photography. Why is that?” Allia asks STARE while describing her process. 

We asked her how she would prefer to be titled and she chuckles while deciding between a photographer, sculptor or someone who makes things. Titled ‘Heavy glinting bronze, breathing flesh?‘ this piece brings together the intricacies of curves and creases on a sculpture and the capacity of photography to freeze a moment in time. Allia makes us question the importance of three-dimensional art in today’s digital world-


“Sculptures inhabit our reality as we do, occupying space; it makes us walk around it. Perhaps we are scared that an inanimate cold stone, heavy glinting bronze, under the sculptor’s touch, can hold as strong of an erotic power as breathing flesh.”


Using her lens to portray the meaning of sculpture as a form of art, she showcases her appreciation one art form through the medium of another. After studying sculpture applied to set design from Ens aama- one of France’s top craft and design school, Allia consistently portrays the importance of knowing the rules before breaking them in her work. She further adds, “if sensuality and attraction are a mechanism for initiating life, attraction to sculpture points to an impossibility, is an aberration; mirrors death. How do you wish for a body that has no capacity to wish for you? Here, I have composed what is perhaps how many people see or wish to see sculptures of human form – harsh, fragmented, cold.”

She leaves us with a taste of her humor saying, “As for me, I can only stop myself from running my hands over these bodies.”